BigRoad provides an app for drivers that allows them to complete and store their log books electronically. We have provided some information below to help drivers and inspectors follow the federal regulations that apply to electronic logs.

Our FAQ provides some general information on the legality of using the BigRoad app as well as guidance on how to proceed during an inspection. This page contains information for enforcement officers, fleet operators, and drivers who are interested in the complete regulatory details.


United States

Using BigRoad as an electronic logbook (not connected to the engine)

The most recent regulatory guidance regarding records of duty status generated by logging software programs was produced on July 10, 2014 in Vol. 79, No. 132 of the Federal Register:
http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2014-07-10/pdf/2014-15951.pdf

In this guidance the FMCSA affirmed that electronic logs are legal and can be used during a roadside inspection. The following is the full text of the updated guidance:

Question 28: May a driver use a computer, tablet, or smartphone (that is not an Automatic On-Board Recording Device) to create, electronically sign, and store the record of duty status (RODS)?

Guidance: Yes. A driver may make manual duty-status entries to a computer, tablet, or smartphone program that is used to generate the graph grid and entries for the record of duty status (RODS) or log book, provided the electronically-generated display (if any) and output includes the minimum information required by § 395.8 and is formatted in accordance with that section. The driver must sign the RODS (manually or electronically) at the end of each 24-hour period to certify that all required entries are true and correct.

A. If electronic signatures are not used:

  • The driver must print and manually sign the RODS daily.
  • The driver must have in his or her possession the printed and signed RODS for the prior seven consecutive days (if required on those days).
  • The driver should be given an opportunity to print and manually sign the current day’s RODS at the time of the inspection.

    B. If RODS have been electronically signed:
    • At the time of an inspection of records by an enforcement official, the driver may display the current and prior seven days RODS to the official on the device’s screen.
    • If the enforcement official requests printed copies of the RODS, the driver must be given an opportunity to print the current and prior seven days RODS (if required on those days) at the time of inspection.

Using the BigRoad Mobile App As An Electronic Logbook

  • Q. Is it FMCSA compliant for a driver to create, sign, store, and transmit their logs electronically using BigRoad?
    A. Yes. The FMCSA established parity between paper and electronic records and signatures in § 390.31 of the FMCSA regulations and affirmed this as part of the July 10, 2014 regulatory guidance in the Federal Register.

  • Q. Can a DOT officer or roadside inspector use the screen on a driver’s phone or tablet to inspect daily logs?
    A.
    Yes. The latest guidance states that:
    At the time of an inspection of records by an enforcement official, the driver may display the current and prior seven days RODS to the official on the device’s screen. If an inspector does not require copies (either electronic or paper) of the logs for their own report then viewing the logs electronically is sufficient and fully compliant with FMCSA regulations.

  • Q. Does a driver need to have the 7 previous consecutive days of logs available as paper copies prior to a roadside inspection?
    A.
    No. The latest guidance states that if the enforcement official requests printed copies of the RODS, the driver must be given an opportunity to print the current and prior seven days RODS (if required on those days) at the time of inspection.

  • Q. Can a DOT officer or roadside inspector accept electronic copies of a driver’s logs instead of paper copies as part of their reporting process?
    A.
    Yes. For example, a roadside inspector could allow a driver to email them a PDF version of the daily logs. The guidance for § 390.31 (Question 10) states that electronic copies can be produced] depending on compatibility with the information systems and how the Agency or other entity entitled to access plans to use the document. Under some circumstances, electronic transfer may be acceptable. In other cases, you may be required to print paper copies of the electronically-stored records or documents.

    The electronic documents are legally equivalent to receiving paper documents. This is the preferred way to conduct a log inspection because it reduces the unnecessary use of paper, as is the intention of the Government Paperwork Elimination Act (GPEA).

  • Q. If a DOT officer or roadside inspector insists on paper copies, how must those paper copies be produced?
    A.
    The requirement for electronic document reproduction is that a paper copy is available “immediately and without risk of losing or altering data.” Inspectors have different interpretations of what methods of reproduction meet this requirement. Some inspectors accept faxed or printed logs sent to the nearest truck stop, or handwritten copies made onto paper log sheets.

  • Q. When a DOT officer or roadside inspector insists on paper copies, must they allow a driver to print their electronic logs in the truck using a connected printer?
    A.
    Yes. The latest guidance states that if the enforcement official requests printed copies of the RODS, the driver must be given an opportunity to print the current and prior seven days RODS (if required on those days) at the time of inspection

  • Q. What about the FMCSA guidance that says a driver using a computer to prepare their logs must print them each day and sign the printed copy?
    A. This guidance was found in questions 27 and 28 for § 395.8 of the FMCSA regulations. It was the FMCSA’s response to queries from the maker of a daily log software program in 2001 & 2002.

    In the July 10, 2014 guidance from the FMCSA question 27 was withdrawn and question 28 was revised with the text found above which explicitly allows the record of duty status to be maintained electronically.

    We expect these updates to be published to the FMCSA website shortly, and be reflected in up-to-date printed rulebooks.

Using BigRoad with an Engine Connection (DashLink)

BigRoad offers an engine-connected solution known as DashLink ELD. Use of the BigRoad Mobile App as part of an engine-connected solution (DashLink) requires installation of DashLink hardware that connects to the diagnostic port of the truck.

BigRoad’s engine-connected solution is fully compliant with § 395.15 regulations for automatic on-board recording devices (AOBRDs).


Canada

Using BigRoad as an Electronic Logbook

The federal hours of service regulations (SOR/2005-313) do not specify the methods that should be used to record daily logs, so there is no prohibition on keeping logs using electronic methods.

British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan have explicitly published their support for electronic logbooks kept on mobile devices in a compliance circular. Other provinces seem to take a similar view of electronic logs, and we haven’t had any violations reported by Canadian drivers when being inspected in Canada. To further reduce the risk of an issue during an inspection we do recommend that drivers outside of British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan have a printer installed in their truck in case an inspector requires a paper copy.

Using BigRoad with an engine connection

BigRoad offers an engine-connected solution known as DashLink ELD. Use of the BigRoad Mobile App as part of an engine-connected solution requires installation of the DashLink ELD hardware device that connects to the diagnostic port of the truck.

BigRoad’s DashLink ELD engine-connected solution is fully compliant with federal hours of service regulations (SOR/2005-313) for Electronic Recording Devices.